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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/09/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    A person contacted me through my YouTube video "Muss I Denn" and a discussion started about constructing a scheitholt/zither/zitter type of instrument. To facilitate sharing the information, I moved a lot of my Zither construction pictures and notes to my OneDrive. While I was there, I reorganized my dulcimer files into PDF files and MP3 files. If I have a PDF file I might have an MP3 file to support it, and vice versa. If anyone sees a PDF without a matching MP3 and vice versa, I can create an appropriate file on request. The PDF files include multiple tunings and usually the file name includes the tuning (CGBb, DAG, DAC, etc.). Dave https://onedrive.live.com/?authkey=!APZ7kXyURRnmQ9s&id=4E95DE6FFA7B2AEA!548&cid=4E95DE6FFA7B2AEA
  2. 2 points
    How to Become A Better Dulcimer Player 15 Adding Variety To Your Playing There are a number of ways to add variety to your solo and/or group dulcimer playing. i.e. playing a harmony; playing backup chords; playing a counter melody; playing a bass part. For this article we will concentrate on playing our melody on a combination of the melody and bass strings. As you know, the notes are the same on both your melody and bass strings when you are tuned to DAD, CGC, GDG, etc. They are one octave apart. When playing songs that you already know, trying mixing up the song by playing part of the melody on the melody string and part of the melody on the bass string. This works best on those songs where you can use drone notes. One method that I like to use is playing the song, as written, all the way through. The second time you play it, try playing one or more measures within the song by flipping the melody notes to the bass string. I have posted one of my arrangements of “Shortnin’ Bread” on this Everything Dulcimer as an example of how you can mix up your melody. Another way of adding variety to your playing is not to play the song the same way each time you play it through. Twenty years ago, Steve Seifert introduced me to “up neighbors” and “down neighbors”. These are notes that are usually one note higher or lower than your melody note. Within a song if you have a quarter note, you can play it twice as an eighth note or play the first eighth note as written and play the next note, one note higher or lower. ie. In your song with quarter notes you have these notes: 1-2-3-4. Try mixing it up by playing 1-1, 2-3, 3-2, 4-5, etc. There are no correct combinations. Same thing with eighth notes. i.e. 4-4, 5-5, 3-3. Try changing to 4-3, 5-4, 3-4, etc. What you are achieving is a variety in your playing by not playing the song the same way each time that you play it. Additionally, if you have a single note within your tab, try adding some drone notes to it. This article is but the “tip of the iceberg” when adding variety to your playing. Perhaps my thoughts will help you to become a better dulcimer player. The bottom line is: If it sounds good, play it! Shortnin' Bread2.pdf
  3. 1 point
    Dear Dulcimer Players, I just learned about this website from Jack Ferguson of Appalachian Flutes and Dulcimer. I would enjoy connecting with you. Please click on the "About Me" tab in my profile to learn more about my journey and get links to my instrumental music to soothe your soul during these challenging times. May we all be inspired to create new tunes during the valleys and storms of life. Grace and peace, Brian Bohlman https://brianbohlman.bandcamp.com/
  4. 1 point
    Even if you play a lot, your dulcimer strings should last a long time. What happens after a period of time is that your strings will oxidize. All metals oxidize, even gold. Yes, gold does oxidize. In order to clean oxidation off of your strings, get yourself a Scotch Brite pad. Cut it in half. Use one half and store the other. Gentle wipe each of your 3(4) strings back and forth a few times to remove the oxidation. Use a soft cloth to remove any residue left on the strings. You might have some green fuzz on your fret board. Get yourself a stick of Fast Fret. Run the Fast Fret back and forth a few times on each string. Your strings should now sound a lot brighter than before.
  5. 1 point
    Key of D version easier to play. Key of G version easier to sing. In the Good Old Summer Time - D.pdf In the Good Old Summer Time - D.mid In the Good Old Summer Time.pdf In the Good Old Summer Time mid.mid
  6. 1 point
    Go Tell Aunt Rhody, Frere Jacques, and Hush Little Baby are good songs for beginners. If a beginner plays another instrument, then these might be too simple. But if a beginner has never played an instrument before, I don't think any simple song is too simple. Dave
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