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  1. The lyrics to this song were written by Robert Burns. The melody was taken from an older Scottish folk song, author unknown. Pay attention to all the dotted quarter notes followed by eighth notes. It is straight forward and easy to play with just three chords, D-G-A. Auld Lang Syne.pdf Auld Lang Syne.mid
    3 points
  2. Lyrics 1. We gather together to ask the Lord’s blessing; He chastens and hastens his will to make known; the wicked oppressing now cease from distressing. Sing praises to his name; he forgets not his own. 2. Beside us to guide us, our God with us joining, ordaining, maintaining his kingdom divine; so from the beginning the fight we were winning; thou, Lord, wast at our side; all glory be thine! 3. We all do extol thee, thou leader triumphant, and pray that thou still our defender wilt be. Let thy congregation escape tribulation; thy name be ever
    3 points
  3. How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player - 21 Three Approaches To Playing The Same Song As in all my articles, nothing is written in stone. They are merely suggestions to make you a better dulcimer player. Why would you need three approaches to playing the same song? The answer is that it depends upon the type of play and the venue of where that song is played. We will discuss group playing at a jam or in a club; group playing at a performance; and solo playing in any situation. Let us begin in group play. Whether in a jam or in a club situation we just whip out our music and sta
    2 points
  4. Can one play Opera on the Dulcimer? Of course! Our instrument is very versatile. The attached aria from the Opera Rigoletto is in the Key of A. La Donna E Mobile.pdf La Donna E Mobile.mid
    2 points
  5. Russian folk song. Kalinka.pdf Kalinka.mid
    2 points
  6. How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player - 20 Embellishments and Other Tips Embellishments should be used sparingly. To many of them will spoil your song. The following thoughts are just that - my thoughts. If they work for you, great. The following suggested thoughts will be applicable to solo play and/or group play. They are not written in stone. 1. Hammer-ons and pull-offs. To be used sparingly throughout solo play. Yes, you can use them in group play; however, they will get lost by the sound of the other players. 2. Dynamics - These are very underused techniques th
    2 points
  7. You're welcome. When you've been messing about with dulcimers as long as I have, paying forward to folks is just what I do.
    2 points
  8. As you can see in the picture below, ball-end strings (top) have a brass "ball" in the end. Loop-end strings have a twisted loop. Those of us who build instruments never use Gorilla glue -- it expands and has a tendency to open cracks. Likwise we seldom, if ever use epoxy. For hairline cracks which can be opened by pressing on one side or the other of a crack, we us a cyanoacrylate (Super) glue. For cracks which need filling, we use a mixture of fine sawdust and Titebond or Titebon II, I often run a bead of the glue into such a crack and then sprinkle sawdust on top,. Then press the m
    2 points
  9. How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player - Part - 19 Finger Positions and Economy of Motion In my first article on “How to Become A Better Dulcimer Player - Part 1”, I briefly touched on the subject of finger positioning. A big impediment to smoother dulcimer playing is not using economy of motion and misplaced finger positioning. Are finger positions written in stone? Absolutely not; however, there are those combinations of finger positions that will result in economy of motion and smoother playing. As stated before, our instrument usually does not have much sustain or vo
    2 points
  10. Here's a video I made for playin' on the porch. Dave
    2 points
  11. I have a CD player that will allow me to load 6 CD's, so I load it with CD's while I'm working in the garage/work shop. One of the CD's I had loaded was the Classic Folk Music CD from Smithsonian Folkways. A song came on and as I listened to it I stopped working on whatever I was working. I went to the CD player and examined the CD insert and found the song to be "John Hardy" by Mike Seeger. I knew I had to learn the song. I found many versions had been recorded in a major key but Mike and Pete Seeger recorded versions in a minor key. I found I liked both versions and worked to learn bot
    2 points
  12. Boil Them Cabbage - Counter Mel.pdf Boil Them Cabbage - Counter Melody.mid
    2 points
  13. A person contacted me through my YouTube video "Muss I Denn" and a discussion started about constructing a scheitholt/zither/zitter type of instrument. To facilitate sharing the information, I moved a lot of my Zither construction pictures and notes to my OneDrive. While I was there, I reorganized my dulcimer files into PDF files and MP3 files. If I have a PDF file I might have an MP3 file to support it, and vice versa. If anyone sees a PDF without a matching MP3 and vice versa, I can create an appropriate file on request. The PDF files include multiple tunings and usually the file name i
    2 points
  14. How to Become A Better Dulcimer Player 15 Adding Variety To Your Playing There are a number of ways to add variety to your solo and/or group dulcimer playing. i.e. playing a harmony; playing backup chords; playing a counter melody; playing a bass part. For this article we will concentrate on playing our melody on a combination of the melody and bass strings. As you know, the notes are the same on both your melody and bass strings when you are tuned to DAD, CGC, GDG, etc. They are one octave apart. When playing songs that you already know, trying mixing up the song by play
    2 points
  15. Key of D version easier to play. Key of G version easier to sing. In the Good Old Summer Time - D.pdf In the Good Old Summer Time - D.mid In the Good Old Summer Time.pdf In the Good Old Summer Time mid.mid
    2 points
  16. Sheer memorization, Dave. I listen to a song 50, 100, 200, or more times, until I can sing/hum or whistle it; on demand. At that point I sit down and pick out the melody tab for it, and play it regularly for about a week in between other tunes. By that time it's imbedded in my long term memory along with a couple hundred other tunes. When I perform I have a Cheat Sheet which has the opening measures of either the tunes in the set I'm going to play, or a general page of maybe a hundred tunes with opening measures (thank Murphy for adjustable lettering in word processors!) printed two column
    2 points
  17. William Tell Overture.pdf William Tell Overture.mid
    1 point
  18. Botany Bay.pdf Botany Bay.MID
    1 point
  19. N-I-C-E! Great job. You've got "the bug" now!
    1 point
  20. Rest are put into a song to create momentary silence. In practical application what needs to happen is the dampening or silencing of the note/chord right before the rest. Using a finger or the edge of your hand as a barr to silence the sound works well. The attached song, Kazachok is both a song and a dance from the Ukraine, written in the 16th century. Pay attention to measure 12-13 and 20-21. After playing the 3rd note of measure 12, you silence that string, count your rest and then play the 4-4-6 chord. When played, it sounds like a hesitation. Do the same for measures
    1 point
  21. This arrangement is a good finger exercise in practicing "not looking" at your fret board. The melody does not go above the 3rd fret. Yankee Doodle.pdf Yankee Doodle.mid
    1 point
  22. Good morning everybody. This is Andy Cohen, Larkin Kelley Bryant's husband. Some of you may know Larkin from seeing her at a festival, from coming to the Memphis Dulcimer Festival, which she co-founded, or from her classic programmed instructional, Larkin's Dulcimer Book. Larkin will turn 77 tomorrow. She is ill with a brain cancer that can be palliated, but not cured. Larkin's Dulcimer Book, which first came out in 1984, is still available, as are the CD that goes with it, Riverlark Squeakless strings, and her very fine (and challenging!) CD, Lark In The Twilight. If any of y'all out th
    1 point
  23. There really is no "correct" width for a fretboard. Those who build 3-string traditional diatonic staple-fretted boards make them about 1" wide. Most 4-string fretboards are around 1-1/2" wide --- 1-3/8ths to 1-5/8ths. 1-1/2 is convenient because it's a stock lumber size called a 1x2. Part of the choice has to do with the "look" of the board on the design. A really wide fretboard on a narrow-waisted hourglass. IMHO doesn't look as good a s somewhat narrower board. A wide-bodied elliptical like a Galax design looks good with a wider board, as does a Tennessee Music Box.
    1 point
  24. Four parts of this lovely song. The melody can be played by itself. The Counter Melody can be played by itself. Harmony and Bass require the Melody. This is a nice way to add some variety to your club or group playing. You can play from 1 to 4 parts. The MIDI files contains all four parts. Pavanne d'anleterre - 4 parts.pdf Pavane d'Angleterre - Melody,Harmony, Bass, Counter Melodytef.mid
    1 point
  25. Wow, Andy, I am so sorry to hear of Larkin's brain tumor. You sound like all of you are handling this well. Although I built my first dulcimer in 1974, I purchased Larkin's book after it came out. I think I wore out the cassette. Please keep us posted as things progress and know that Larkin holds a special place in our hearts. Ken "The dulcimer sings a sweet song."
    1 point
  26. A song by Turlough O'Carolan written in 1691. A good finger exercise. Lord Inchiquin.pdf Lord Inchiquin.mid
    1 point
  27. The attached song was written by Turlough O'Carolan, the blind Irish harper. It is said to be his first song. Most of the really old songs are easy to play, in as much as they usually have no more than three chords (D-G-A) for this one. Notice that the chords are on the second, rather than the first notes. Si Beag Si Mhor.pdf Si Beag Si Mhor.mid
    1 point
  28. Well I called it quits after a soft luster of 6 coats. I used brads at the tail block and strung it up. Cut one string too short in the process and had to get another. The important thing: it has a nice tone and the intonation is fine! I will be adjusting the action in the coming days. Thanks everyone for all the tips and suggestions along the way, and for the future! Time to move on to the “learning to play” discussions! Here are the final pics...
    1 point
  29. Precious Lord Take My Hand - D.pdf Precious Lord Take My Hand - D.mid
    1 point
  30. Looks like you've got plenty there to go on! Scott Antes was a well known and respected dulcimer builder. His how-to build a Hammered Dulcimer is highly regarded. That James Hall design is called a Fiddle shape. Not particularly common, but a nice shape. More difficult to build than an Hourglass, as you've noticed. 28.5" VSL is very long by modern standards. If you play Noter & Drone or Fingerdance style they can be good. But modern Chord-Melody stylists with short fingers find them harder to work with. Most today are built with a 26" or 27" VSL. I don't know the Hall name a
    1 point
  31. I know there are plenty of tablature files available, but I thought I would provide the link to my OneDrive anyway. I've added some Christmas tablature in DAA, DAC, DAG, and other tunings. I've also been adding a lot of non-holiday tablature. Dave OneDrive
    1 point
  32. 0:51 Now playing Watch later Watch later Add to queue Add to queue 0:43 Now playing Watch later Watch later Add to queue Add to queue 0:29 Now playing Watch later Watch later Add to queue Add to queue DBGChromaticChordChart1To7.docx
    1 point
  33. A traditional Irish jig. Emphasis on the first and fourth notes. The Road To Lisdoonvarna.pdf The Road To Lisdoonvarna.mid
    1 point
  34. So glad Everything Dulcimer is back. FB is good but loved going to E D. To read about dulcimer stuff. Thank you to whomever brought this back.
    1 point
  35. 1. Don't recognize the maker, but the design, with the pins in the side blocks, is NOT common. 2. Those ARE loop end strings. They start on one side, cross over the top, around a pin on the far side, then back to the start. What gauges? You'll need a micrometer to measure that. You'll also want to know the length of the longest string -- from loop end across to the pin and back. Where? Folkcraft may be able to help. I buy most of my strings from www.juststrings.com; but then I know exactly what I want. 3. Yes that crack in the pin line is "worrisome". Those holes probably s
    1 point
  36. I got these from a local estate sale in Springfield Mo. I thought they were too neat to leave behind. the picture of the finished one is his son. I wish I had gotten more info on them.
    1 point
  37. Anytime you get a second hand instrument, it's a good thing to change strings. One at a time -- do NOT take them all off them put them all back. If the bridge or nut aren't in exactly the right place it can really mess things up if one or both fall out of place, and string tension will keep them where they belong. What is the VSL? That's the distance between the inside edge of the nut and the inside edge of the bridge. THAT, plus what you want for the home tuning, is what tells you which strings to buy. There are charts and calculators, but virtually ALL pre-packaged sets of "dulcimer"
    1 point
  38. Welcome! Feel free to ask any questions you have and we'll try to help you out. Regarding the strings - most of the time a DAA set will make it up into DAd, though depending on the exact gauge they may not. Also if the strings are older you may want to go ahead and change them anyways. Looking at the fretboard, your dulcimer doesn't have a 6 1/2 fret on it so a 1-5-5 tuning like DAA or CGG may be better for playing most tunes. These are tuning for playing the major scale from the 3rd fret up to the 10th fret, also known as Ionian mode. Without the 6 1/2 fret if it's tuned DAd
    1 point
  39. You can play the bass part on a standard dulcimer. Great Is Thy Faithfulness - Melody and Bass.pdf Great Is Thy Faithfulness - Melody and Bass.mid
    1 point
  40. In order to be a counter-melody, the music not only has to harmonize with the melody, but must also be able to stand on its own as a melody. God Of Our Fathers 2 parts.pdf God Of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand Melody and Counter Melody.mid
    1 point
  41. In order to be a counter-melody, the music not only has to harmonize with the melody, but must also be able to stand on its own as a melody.
    1 point
  42. How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player - 12 Bending Notes The majority of the songs that we dulcimer players play are usually straight forward and do not require, either a 1½ fret or the bending of one or more notes to achieve a sharp or a flat note. In order to play most contemporary music and some hymns, there are two things that you will need to have. The first is a 1½ fret. The second is the ability to be able to bend notes. Most dulcimer players are uncomfortable when they see a + sign following a note. It is really no big deal. I will tell you how I bend notes.
    1 point
  43. Dear Dulcimer Players, I just learned about this website from Jack Ferguson of Appalachian Flutes and Dulcimer. I would enjoy connecting with you. Please click on the "About Me" tab in my profile to learn more about my journey and get links to my instrumental music to soothe your soul during these challenging times. May we all be inspired to create new tunes during the valleys and storms of life. Grace and peace, Brian Bohlman https://brianbohlman.bandcamp.com/
    1 point
  44. Even if you play a lot, your dulcimer strings should last a long time. What happens after a period of time is that your strings will oxidize. All metals oxidize, even gold. Yes, gold does oxidize. In order to clean oxidation off of your strings, get yourself a Scotch Brite pad. Cut it in half. Use one half and store the other. Gentle wipe each of your 3(4) strings back and forth a few times to remove the oxidation. Use a soft cloth to remove any residue left on the strings. You might have some green fuzz on your fret board.
    1 point
  45. Hello, All, I'm always trying to maximize the sonic potentials of my dulcimers (or just of the dulcimer in general), and have been trying out and using various finger picks, since I can't keep my fingernails long. Furthermore, the picks produce a greater variety of sounds than I could make with my fingernails. I wanted to share that I've figured out a way to get a sharp point with nail clippers and a nail file on the Fred Kelly Delrin finger picks (which by themselves, worn the correct way, produce too dull a sound for me). Having the sharp point on the Fred Kelly allows for a sou
    1 point
  46. Yes! I wish you could have imported all of the content from the old one though. Thank you so much. I hadn't visited the site in several years, but it was a lot of fun.
    1 point
  47. I second that. Thank you so much for bringing Everything Dulcimer back. Many friendships were built through the old site and hopefully, they will continue here!
    1 point
  48. Go Tell Aunt Rhody, Frere Jacques, and Hush Little Baby are good songs for beginners. If a beginner plays another instrument, then these might be too simple. But if a beginner has never played an instrument before, I don't think any simple song is too simple. Dave
    1 point
  49. Welcome; thank you for taking on this enormous task and saving the domain name. Best of luck from UK.
    1 point
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