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EverythingDulcimer

lshillman

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  1. Makes sense, thanks for the picture. Great. I have some Titebond lying around somewhere, and I'm sure I can generate some sawdust. Thank you for the detailed explanation!
  2. Somehow I didn't get a notification about your reply, @NoterMan —thanks for the quick response! I guess I was confused about the string vocabulary—I was assuming "loop-end" meant that the strings have loops on the ends? There are a couple like that on this instrument, but those ones only make a single trip across the sound board. Most of the strings don't have loops, they're just connected to two tuning pins. I'll reach out to Folkcraft and see what they say. I was able to find someone else who knew this dulcimer's original owner, and they think he built it from scratch, so that expl
  3. Hi folks, I was recently given a dulcimer that had spent 30 years gathering dust in a hot, dry attic. I'm told it has a much longer history, but its original owner, who possibly built it from a kit, died in 1990 and it hasn't been played since. I searched around and found a tuning chart and some youtube videos on tuning, and actually managed to get it sounding somewhat decent. Of course a few of the highest strings snapped while I was tuning it. A friend of mine who plays said the best place to get replacement strings is from the original manufacturer, but as I said, this thing is ol
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