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Carolina Rockman

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Everything posted by Carolina Rockman

  1. Modern Mountain Bass Dulcimer made by David McKenney. Wood: Top: Walnut Sides: Walnut Back: Walnut Fret Board: Walnut with Ebony overlay. Length: Overall: 37½ inches Lower bout: 8 1/8 inches Upper bout: 6 ¾ inches Thickness:2 ¼ inches Fret board: 31 inches Tuners: Planet Wave self-trimming machine Tuners(These tuners added $100. to the initial cost of the dulcimer) There is a non-functioning pickup inside the dulcimer. It does not affect the sound. This dulcimer has excellent volume and sustain. The cost of a new bare bones bass dulcimer from David is $850. What is included: The pictured bass dulcimer Embroidered adjustable lap strap from Lee Felt. The dulcimer stand is not included. No case/bag. Costs: Dulcimer: $400. Shipping: via UPS - Shipping fee $120.00. Box and bubble wrap and Styrofoam peanuts - $30.. Insurance: $15. Grand total shipping: $165. Total cost with shipping: $565. Dulcimer can picked up in Bradenton, FL. No shipping costs that way.
  2. Baritone Dulcimer For Sale $400. Modern Mountain Baritone Dulcimer made by David McKenney. Wood: Top: Western Cedar Sides: Rosewood Back: Rosewood Fret Board: Rosewood with Ebony overlay. Length: Overall: 37½ inches Lower bout: 8 1/8 inches Upper bout: 6 1/8 inches Thickness:2 ¼ inches Fret board: 31 ½ inches This dulcimer has excellent volume and sustain. This dulcimer is tuned to ADA to play in the keys of D and G. Retuning the dulcimer to AEA will allow you to play in the key of A. The cost of a new bare bones baritone dulcimer from David is $850. + shipping. What is included: The pictured baritone dulcimer Embroidered adjustable lap strap from Lee Felt. The dulcimer stand is not included. No case/bag. Costs: Dulcimer: $400. Shipping: via UPS - Shipping fee $120.00. Box and bubble wrap and Styrofoam peanuts - $30.. Insurance: $15. Grand total shipping: $165. Total cost with shipping: $565. Dulcimer can picked up in Bradenton, FL. No shipping costs that way.
  3. Custom Wormy Chestnut Mountain Dulcimer $400.00 . This dulcimer was custom built using Wormy Chestnut for the sound board (top). I have never seen another dulcimer with this wood. Its original cost was $650. The soft case (by Lee Felt) cost $125. The fret board is 31 1/8 inches Overall length is 38¼ inches. Depth is 1 ¾ inches. Sound holes: S - Shaped The fret board shows no wear. Top: Wormy Chestnut Sides: Walnut Fret Board: Walnut Back: Walnut Scroll Head: Walnut Four tuners - strung in DAD. What is included: Dulcimer Soft Green Dulcimer Bag with hand strap and shoulder strap by Lee Felt Adjustable lap strap by Lee Felt. The dulcimer stand is NOT INCLUDED! This dulcimer can be seen in Bradenton, FL Pickup is the least expensive option. Shipping, which is beyond my control is as follows: USPS Shipping Charge - $120. Cardboard box, bubble wrap, and Styrofoam peanuts - $20. Postal Insurance - $15. If this seems high, UPS and FedEx charge almost double. I originally paid $715. total for this dulcimer. It is in excellent condition. It is worth a lot more than $400.; however, I have reduced the price to offset the shipping charges.
  4. Custom McSpadden Mountain Dulcimer $200.00 . This dulcimer was custom built by McSpadden. . The skeleton scroll head (walnut) was added. Its original cost was $450. The hard case cost $65. The fret board is 29¾ inches. Overall length is 36¼ inches. Depth is 1 ¾ inches. Sound holes: Heart Shaped The fret board shows some wear right above the strum hollow. Top: Western Cedar Sides : Walnut Fret Board: Walnut Back : Bookend matched Walnut Scroll Head: Dark Walnut Four tuners - strung in DAD. This dulcimer had a hairline crack on the soundboard (top). It was repaired by McSpadden and is not visible. It was located above, looking straight on, one of the heart sound holes. Photo #5 was taken to show the location. The repair did not affect the sound. What is included: Dulcimer Hard Black Dulcimer Case Adjustable lap strap by Lee Felt. The dulcimer stand is NOT INCLUDED! This dulcimer can be seen in Bradenton, FL Pickup is the least expensive option. Shipping, which is beyond my control is as follows: USPS Shipping Charge - $130. Cardboard box, bubble wrap, and Styrofoam peanuts - $20. Postal Insurance - $15. If this seems high, UPS and FedEx charge almost double. I originally paid $515. total for this dulcimer. It is in excellent condition. It is worth a lot more than $200.; however, I have reduced the price to offset the shipping charges.
  5. Bill Taylor Chromatic Double Back Mountain Dulcimer $600.00 There are so many songs that we would like to play, especially those in contemporary music, which is beyond the capabilities of our diatonic instruments. Yes, we can play in D-G-Bm-and Em. If we have a 1½ fret we can also play in Am-Dm and some songs in the key of C. With a chromatic dulcimer we can play in every key. We now have all of the notes in every key. I know that seeing all those frets seems daunting; however, the distance between notes is still the same. What has been added is half-notes (sharps and flats). This Bill Taylor classic chromatic mountain dulcimer was made by Bill, roughly around 2004. Of all the dulcimers that Bill made over the years (1500+), this was his first chromatic one. I chose every piece of wood for this custom dulcimer, including the rare South American Canary Wood, which is a hardwood. It is a member of the Tulip Tree family of woods. . The wood used by Bill is as follows: Sides and 2nd back - rare South American Canary Wood. Fret Board - East Indian Rosewood over Canary Wood. Top - Western Cedar 1st Back - Western Cedar Scroll Head - Canary Wood - Walnut - Canary Wood End Cap - Rosewood Four tuners - Only three strung in DAD. The fourth string is on the lap-side of the dulcimer, held by a brass pins. In case of the melody string breaking, the fourth string can be moved up quickly for replacement. The pin can be seen in a vertical photo. What is included: Dulcimer Black Soft Dulcimer Bag made by Lee Felt (The Bag Lady). The bag has a handle for hand carry and a shoulder strap. Adjustable lab strap by Lee Felt. The dulcimer stand is NOT INCLUDED! • This instrument has excellent volume and excellent sustain. This dulcimer can be seen in Bradenton, FL Shipping, which is beyond my control is as follows: USPS Shipping Charge - $120. Cardboard box, bubble wrap, and Styrofoam peanuts - $20. Postal Insurance - $15. If this seems high, UPS and FedEx charge almost double. I originally paid $1200. For this dulcimer. It is in prime condition. It is worth more than $600.; however, I have reduced the price to offset the shipping charges.
  6. Dulcimer sold wxithin hours. Thank you for looking. I will have a Bill Taylor Chromatic dulcimer for sale soon.
  7. Bill Taylor Resonator Double Back Wood Spirit Mountain Dulcimer $850.00 This Bill Taylor classic mountain dulcimer was made by Bill, roughly around 2004. Of all the dulcimers that Bill made over the years (1500+), he made very few with this hand-carved Wood Spirit strum hollow. This addition added $100. to the cost of the dulcimer. It is priced at $850. Free shipping! The wood used by Bill is as follows: Back and sides - Curly Cherry 1st Back and Sound board - Western Cedar Scroll head -Cherry-Maple-Cherry Fret Board - Vertical Grain Cherry with an Ebony overlay Back - Curly Maple Four tuners - Only three strung in DAD. The fourth string is on the lab-side of the dulcimer, held by two brass pins. In case of melody string breaking, the fourth string can be moved up quickly for replacement. One of the pins can be seen in a vertical photo. What is included: Dulcimer Gray Soft Dulcimer Bag made by Lee Felt (The Bag Lady). The bag has a handle for hand carry, a shoulder strap, and two back-packer straps. The dulcimer stand is NOT INCLUDED! • This instrument has excellent volume and excellent sustain.
  8. I believe that the song was originally written in the Key of Bb. My arrangement is in the Key of Bm in order for us to be able to play it. Ukranian National Anthem - D.pdf Ukranian National Anthem - D.mid
  9. How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player - 25 Timing One of the most neglected skills in playing the dulcimer is proper timing. A typical scenario is that you are in a jam session/club meeting, etc. The song is mostly composed of ¼ notes. All of a sudden, there is a bunch of 1/8th notes. Someone starts speeding up, thinking that the 1/8th notes should be played a lot faster. The players to the left and right of the offender start playing faster too. Everyone joins in the race. We have all experienced this. Just think what happens when there some 16th notes thrown into the song. We mostly play in 4/4 timing. That is four beats or a combination of notes to equal four beats per measure. If you are playing at 70 beats per minutes (BPM), however many notes are within each measure are played for the same duration of time. This could be one or more notes or no notes (rests). Here is where a metronome comes in handy. It keeps us on target by its click/sounds. Timing skills don’t just happen. It takes a lot of effort and practice to gain this skill. My personal belief is that we all should have a metronome available to us when we practice. If you cannot afford one, there are a number of them available as software for free on the Internet. A search on the Internet using the words: “Free Metronome” should bring up a number of choices. I have written a practice piece of 25 measures in the Key of D, using D-G-A chords. The practice sheet is by no means complete or intended to be so. It will get you started on proper timing. Play the MIDI file when using the PDF Practice Sheet. Always have fun on your journey to becoming a better dulcimer player. TimingPractice.pdf TimingPractice.mid
  10. How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player - 23 How can you join the Jam if you don’t know the song? Aside from the wonderful classes that we attend at a dulcimer festival or workshop are the numerous jams at all levels of skill. All of us have attended jams where either we did not know the song or we knew it but could not play it from memory. Rare is the jam where the participants use written tab. Normally, one person calls the song and before you could get to your written tab, everyone is five measures into the song. We can either sit out that song or somehow participate as a player. How do we do that? One of the ways is the subject of this article. Most of the songs that we play are in the Key of D. What follows is applicable to all keys; however, we are only concerned with the Key of D for right now. Each musical key has a pentatonic scale. A pentatonic scale contains only five notes. In the Key of D, those notes are D-E-F#-A-B. Numerically, this translates to your fret board on the melody and bass strings as 0(Open)-1-2-4-5. You may ask, “How can these notes help me to participate in a jam? The best way to show you is for you to show yourself. Pick a song in the Key of D, any song. If you have an audio version of that song in the Key of D, whether MP3, MIDI, Tabledit, etc. you will be playing along with that song. To begin with, you should keep the same timing as in the song. You can match the song note for note or play anywhere from one to four notes per measure (if in 4/4 time) or three notes per measure (in ¾ time), etc. Yes, you can even add a note or two (as eighth notes, sixteenths, etc.). What notes are they? They will be any of the pentatonic scale notes just mentioned: D-E-F#-A-B. Tabs: 0-1-2-4-5. You can play these notes in any order. They will harmonize with the melody notes. Doesn’t sound possible? Give it a try. You will be pleasantly surprised. When you are comfortable doing this, here is another suggestion. Pinch/pluck the melody and bass strings at the same time for notes an octave apart. Remember to stay within the pentatonic scale. Is this cool or what? A third method in this brief article is playing barre chords within the pentatonic scale of D (or any other scale). I normally play my dulcimer using the following fingering: Index finger on the bass string. Middle finger on the middle strings. Ring finger on the melody string. This will work for about 80% of the songs that we play. It gives your thumb a lot of latitude to fret other strings. You use whatever fingering that is comfortable. Especially when playing barre chords, it is very easy to slide up and down your fret board using the suggested fingering. Lastly, when you are comfortable doing all of the above, try mixing all of the above methods. People will think that you are a musical genius. In a future article, I will discuss playing on the middle string using the pentatonic scale. Hopefully, this article about joining the jam using the pentatonic scale will help you in How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player.
  11. Do You Need Tabledit Do you need the Tabledit program? The answer is: “It depends.” If you are just wanting to be able to read other people’s songs and arrangements, you do not need Tabledit. You can download a free program called “TEFVIEW” and it will permit you to download, view, and hear any particular file in the TEF format. You cannot change anything. If it is your desire to document your original songs, make your own arrangements of other songs, create conductor’s scores, etc., Tabledit is a good way to go. What the program will not do is to magically create a score for you. My personal opinion is that at the very least, you should be able to read music and have a good grasp on musical timing when beginning Tabledit.. I have, in the past, used other music notation software, including Finale. I have found that the Tabledit program the easiest to work with. Cost wise, you cannot beat the price. The program takes a lot of effort and time on your behalf to become proficient with it. Realistically it will take many months to become comfortable with it. The program was originally written for the guitar. Other stringed instruments were gradually add and then other than stringed instruments were also added. The dulcimer module is actually not that old. Using it will permit you to work in multiple tunings, i.e DAD, DAA, ADA, GDG, CGC, etc. As a matter of fact, you can work in about any key or tuning. You can also work with three or four strings. There is also a Chromatic Module. If you do have the Tabledit program, I would definitely download the user manual. It is quite lengthy with lots of good information. It is in no way complete and I personally feel that it could be more user friendly. With that said, it is a big help. The originator and owner of the software lives in France. He as well as his U.S. representative have been very helpful to me over the years. If at all possible, I would suggest that you take a course or two about Tabledit via one of the dulcimer festivals or on-line offerings. Hands-on is always the best way. Steve Seifert, Tull Glazener, and Terry Lewis have taught Tabledit in the past. You might do a Google search for “Tabledit Instruction”.
  12. Hopefully these will work for you. On your opening screen, first line, directly below the words "MIDI" and "Score" you will see a "checkmark". Left click on it. It will open your options menu. The attached PDF files should correspond with that menu. I would print out the attached PDF files to work with. In your "Options" menu the headings should correspond to your PDF files. Those are the settings that I currently use. Once you are familiar with using Tabledit, you can change any of those settings to suit your preferences. Advanced.pdf Display.pdf Fonts.pdf General.pdf Multitrack.pdf Page Layout.pdf Preferences.pdf Printing.pdf Screen.pdf Setup Master file.pdf
  13. A good practice song that can be used in the discussion, How to Become A Better Dulcimer Player - 22 "Don't Look" Arkansas Traveler - Low Melody only.pdf
  14. How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player - 22 “Don’t Look!” When playing a piece of music for the first time, we are presented with the problem of looking at the tablature, looking at our fret board, positioning our fingers, playing the note or stumming the chord, and sounding good, all at the same time, all in the space of 1-2 seconds.. Almost forgot, we then have to look back at the music for the next note or chord and repeat the process all over. The easiest and smoothest way to play a piece of music is from memory. Some of us can remember dozens, if not hundreds of songs from memory. There are those of us, whose memory is either failing or not that good in the first place. We have to have a piece of dulcimer music in front of us to play it. This article is for us memory challenged folks. Have you ever noticed that at our dulcimer festivals that the instructors who perform are not looking at their instruments? This is what we hope to achieve. It can be done and it will take a lot of practice. I would suggest that you start your practice without a piece of music. Picture the fret board in your mind’s eye. I normally use the following fingering for the majority of the music that I play. Ring finger on the melody string. Middle finger on the middle string. Index finger on the bass string. Using this configuration gives your thumb a lot of latitude to move around. Without looking at your fret board, put your ring finger on the first fret, melody string. Keeping that finger anchored, use your middle finger and place in on the 1½ fret (if you have one)or the second fret., Use your index finger and place it on the 3rd fret. Reverse the order and go down the fret board one fret at a time. Once you have mastered those positions, begin again with your ring finger on the 1st fret. Keeping your ring finger in place, use your thumb to go up the fret board and then back down the fret board one position at a time. Now move onto the middle string and repeat the process. When you are comfortable with the middle string, move to the bass string and repeat the process all over again. When you are comfortable and can pretty well hit the mark each time you put your fingers down without looking, work your way up the fret board on each string. Do not be discouraged when you misplace your fingers on the fret board. This process will require a lot of effort and practice on your part. It can be done. I would suggest that you start with a piece of music that does not go above the 3rd or 4th fret and that has the melody notes only. If it has chords, just play the melody notes. When beginning, I would start my practice by finger picking the notes. Try to picture your fret board in your mind’s eye, not looking at the real one. Once you have mastered that song, you can learn to play by “not looking” with your pick. Finger picking is so much easier. You can then add the appropriate chords once that you have gotten your song pretty well perfected. Are you going to make a lot of mistakes? You bettcha! Practice does make perfect. It will take time and effort on your part; however, the final result is that your playing will be smoother, your sound and performance much better. Go to the tablature section of this website and look for Arkansas_Travelerlow.PDF for a good song to begin with. Hopefully these suggestions will help you in How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player. Arkansas_Travelerlow.pdf
  15. It is with great sorrow and heartfelt grief that I inform you all of the passing of my dear friend, Bill Taylor. Surrounded by his loving family, Bill passed quietly on Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021. We all learned so much about music and the dulcimer from Bill. Those of us who attended his classes walked away from each one of them, a better musician and dulcimer player. The hundreds, if not thousands of his student would attest to that. Bill was a gentle soul. It was one of his many qualities. As a musician and dulcimer player, he was one of the best. As a human being he was the Best! I consider Bill to have been a great dulcimer player, and yet he never sought the limelight. He was just as content playing backup for another musician as being a solo performer. I never heard one harsh or bad word about Bill. Everyone loved him. The guitar that accompanied so many performers was built by Bill - another of his talents. As a luthier, he was unsurpassed. He introduced a quality of dulcimer and design that has not been surpassed. Not only did his instruments sound great; they were beautiful to look at and own. If you were fortunate enough to have had Bill as a friend, he was a loyal, giving, caring man who treasured your friendship. He loved his family, music, the dulcimer, and fly fishing. There will be a memorial for Bill in the future. There is nothing firm about where or when. As his widow gives me that information, I will pass it along. The following is Bill’s obituary. “ William “Bill” Taylor passed away October 3, 2021 with his family at his side. Bill was born November 5, 1954 in Maryville, Tennessee. He graduated from Maryville High School and The University of Tennessee. He picked up the guitar at the age of 20 and quickly became an accomplished musician. He played with Citico Creek bluegrass band at Silver Dollar City and then Dollywood, and also many music festivals and competitions. The band performed on the Grand Ole Opry in 1983. He met his wife, Barbara in 1980, and they just celebrated 41 years of marriage on September 20th. He later became a skilled luthier and built over 1500 mountain dulcimers. He also taught music lessons and performed at festivals all over the eastern United States and helped found the Knoxville Dulcimer Club. He embarked on a new career later in life as a school teacher at Jones Cove Elementary School. He also shared his combined love of mountain music and nature with generations of Sevier County children at the Eugene Huskey Environmental Center. Bill will be remembered for his kind and generous nature. He approached family and friends with an impractical level of patience. He was an extraordinarily loving husband and father, as well as a supportive teacher, coach and scout leader. He had a lifelong love of fishing which he shared with family and friends. The trout of East Tennessee are the only ones not mourning his passing. He was preceded in death by his parents, Thomas and Barbara Taylor, sister and brother-in-law Pat and Harry Dean, and sister Susan Hitch. Left to cherish his memory are his wife, Barbara Taylor of Pigeon Forge, daughter and son-in-law Emma and Michael Mealer of Richland, WA, son and daughter-in-law Brett and Kendra Taylor of Guam, grandchildren Euan and Vivian Taylor and Benjamin Mealer, and a host of other family members and special friends. A special thank you to UT Hospice for the comfort and support they provided. A celebration of Bill’s life will be held at a later date when it is safe to gather in his memory. Anyone wishing to honor his life, please consider a donation to the Alzheimer’s Association (www.alz.org).
  16. This is as easy to play. To add some color to your playing, you might play the song on the melody string the first time through, the bass string the second time through and back to the melody string the third time through. Little Liza Jane - Bass.pdf Little Liza Jane - Bass.mid
  17. Many of the songs written in the 1600's and 1700's had unusual timing. This song was written in 6/4 timing (6 - ¼ notes per measure). Rock Of Ages.pdf Rock Of Ages.mid
  18. Ainsley's Waltz.pdf Ainsley's Waltz.mid
  19. "Yankee Doodle" is a well-known American song and a nursery rhyme, the early versions of which predate the Seven Years War and The American Revolution. It is often sung patriotically in the United States today and is the state anthem of Connecticut The melody is thought to be much older than both the lyrics and the subject, going back to folk songs of Medieval Europe. Yankee Doodle.pdf Yankee Doodle.mid
  20. Lucy Long.pdf Lucy Long.mid
  21. This song was written by St. Francis of Assisi as a poem, circa 1225. It was not put to music until, circa 1899 by William Draper. Like most of the older songs, the timing is unusual. The song is in 3/2 timing (3 half notes per measure or 6 quarter notes per measure). As in all songs, the timing is everything, i.e. look at the second measure. The 2-3-4 is a whole note (four counts) followed by 2-0-0 (two counts) for a total of six counts. The song is easy to play with only D, G, and A chords. Listen to the audio file for the timing. All Creatures Of Our God And King.pdf All Creatures Of Our God And King.mid
  22. How To Become A Better Dulcimer Player - 21 Three Approaches To Playing The Same Song As in all my articles, nothing is written in stone. They are merely suggestions to make you a better dulcimer player. Why would you need three approaches to playing the same song? The answer is that it depends upon the type of play and the venue of where that song is played. We will discuss group playing at a jam or in a club; group playing at a performance; and solo playing in any situation. Let us begin in group play. Whether in a jam or in a club situation we just whip out our music and start playing, right? Well, maybe not. In this type of situation, you have the great latitude in playing. Different arrangements of the song can be played together as long as the chord changes are the same and at the same position in the music. Yes, you can deviate somewhat from the written chord changes by substituting a minor chord where there is a major chord. For example: Instead of play a D-chord, you may substitute a Bm-chord (as long as it sounds good). In all group settings it is important that everyone be on the same page. It is up to the group leader or whoever calls the song to set the tempo and give a lead-in so that everyone knows when to start playing and at what speed. Playing a recognizable phrase from the song is always a good way to lead everyone into the song. For example: In the song, “Amazing Grace”, a good place to play your lead-in phrase is: “Was blind, but now I see”. You are playing enough measures so that everyone can follow along and know when to start playing. Whoever calls the song should also state the number of times that it will be played. Another way to play a lead-in is to play a series of chords from the key that the song is in. For example: Play D-G-A for songs in the key of D. Play G-C-D for songs in the key of G. Group play gives us great latitude for embellishments and creativity. For example: If a song has four quarter notes in a measure, you may want to play any combination of quarter and eighth notes. Try going up or down one note. Decades ago when I took a course from Stephen Seifert, he referred to these notes as Up-neighbors and Down-neighbors. They will add spice and color to your music. If your song has a series of tied measures, there will be a lot of “open space” in the music. Sometimes this sounds good and at other times, the silence can be improved. For example: Your song has two measures of a D-chord tied together. That is eight counts. You may want to arpeggiate the first D-chord (D-A-F#-A) and play the second D-chord once. Let us move onto group playing at a performance. Someone should be designated as the group leader. He or she will introduce the song and play the lead-in for each song being played. It is important here for consistency, that everyone use the same arrangement of the song. Recognizable phrases are important because it helps the audience recognize the song, sort of a teaser. Prior to playing the song, if there is some information about the song that you know, share it with the audience and that will help the them to better understand who wrote the song and why it was written. For example, the background of “Amazing Grace” is amazing. Share this type of information with your audience. If, during your group performance, you will be playing some songs that require the use of a Capo, save those songs for last. That way you will only have to retune one time. This brings us to the third approach of playing a song. Whether we are playing a solo at our respective clubs, in jam, or at a performance, we have the most latitude for playing a song and making it “our own”. Many of the techniques and suggestions of the first two approaches will be applicable to our solo play. One of the things that can be used effectively in solo play is dynamics. Here you can play a phrase softer or louder, increase or decrease your tempo, change the key of the song, etc. Chord-Melody strumming will give you the most volume. Flat picking a song will give you the most volume for solo play.. Finger picking adds a softness and fluidity to your song. Economy of motion is best achieved through finger picking. Hopefully these suggestions will help you to Become A Better Dulcimer Player.
  23. Can one play Opera on the Dulcimer? Of course! Our instrument is very versatile. The attached aria from the Opera Rigoletto is in the Key of A. La Donna E Mobile.pdf La Donna E Mobile.mid
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