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T - 6


KWL
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This is my sixth teardrop dulcimer. The shape comes from plans by Scott Antes and the peg head from a Popular Woodworking article. Many years ago David Lynch gave me some poplar that had a green hue to it. I finally decided to take it off the shelf and build something with it. As you can see there is no strum hollow. I plan to put four equidistant strings on it and tune all four to "d".  There is still a lot of work to be done; final sanding, dress all the frets, put on a finish (probably tung oil), install the open gear tuners, tune it up, and play it. I also have a Prichard under construction, but I'm on my second peg head and second top. At least the back and sides are in good shape on that one. I'm making maple pegs for the Prichard. I have them rough cut and need to taper the shafts.
 

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweet song."

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Edited by KWL
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"Do folks ever build tops and backs that are not bookmatching?"
ALL THE TIME!!   I think out of 300 builds I've only ever book-matched one or two.  Personally I prefer one-piece tops and backs rather than two-pieced book-matched.  If you build wide dulcimers though, finding wide thin planks can be problematic and so multi-piece tops and backs become necessary, and book-matching makes multi-piece T&B look a lot nicer...

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I just “stumbled” upon this thread. As a very amateur woodworker, I’m very impressed with your skills. That Dulcimer is beautiful! Have you ever used any hickory to build one? I’ve got a bunch of rough sawn hickory from a tree that came down 15+ years ago. It’s been in my pole barn with sticks between it and I’m beginning to think about what to use for.

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Hickory makes some really fine dulcimers.  A number of us who build traditional dulcemores use the wide variety of woods available in the Eastern US, including hickory, walnut, poplar, chestnut (usually salvaged from old barns and such), and much more.

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I haven't used hickory yet. I do have a friend how plays a hickory dulcimer and it sound really nice.If I had some hickory I'd be using it to make some dulcimers.

Ken

"The dulcimer sings a sweets song."

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